Make Ahead Breakfast Sandwiches

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by Liz

I have received a few emails regarding my breakfast sandwiches, so I thought I would share with you my ingredient list and process for this super easy, money saver.

Just by comparing a couple of lower priced store alternatives, compared to making these breakfast sandwiches at home, you can save quite a bit of money and make yourself a hearty, healthy start to any day.

Aldi breakfast sandwich, 4 ct. for $2.99 = 75 cents a sandwich.

Jimmy Dean Breakfast Sandwich 8 ct for $10.79 =1.35 a sandwich (Wal-Mart)

Homemade sandwich = 39 cents a sandwich

(All prices below are from Aldi)

Eggs .70/12= .06

Bagels $1.00/6= .17

Cheese $2.49/24= .10

Ham $2.99/50= .06

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Ingredients:

1 package of 6 bagels (your choice of flavor)

½ dozen large eggs

Salt and pepper

12 thinly sliced pieces of deli ham

6 processed cheese slices (such as Kraft, Borden or store brand)

Directions:

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1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees.  Line a cookie sheet with aluminum foil, open and spread out bagels to ensure even toasting. 

2. Toast bagels in oven 7 to 10 minutes or until lightly toasted. (You don’t want a dark toast on these, just a very light toast) Set aside and let cool.

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3. Meanwhile, in a large non-stick skillet, over medium heat, you want to cook your eggs. Lightly salt and pepper your eggs while in the pan and cook to desired consistency. Set aside and let cool.

4. Add 1 slice of deli ham to each piece of bagel until each piece is covered.

5. Add 1 slice of cheese to one ½ of each sandwich and then add 1 egg to other half.

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6. Close sandwich, wrap individually and store in fridge up to a week or freezer for up to 3 months.

7. Reheat in microwave 20 to 30 seconds.

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Make Ahead Breakfast Sandwiches
Yields 6
Make yourself a hearty and healthy breakfast for on the go at a fraction of the price.
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643 calories
60 g
449 g
26 g
40 g
11 g
294 g
1639 g
1 g
0 g
12 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
294g
Yields
6
Amount Per Serving
Calories 643
Calories from Fat 229
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 26g
40%
Saturated Fat 11g
55%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 3g
Monounsaturated Fat 9g
Cholesterol 449mg
150%
Sodium 1639mg
68%
Total Carbohydrates 60g
20%
Dietary Fiber 3g
13%
Sugars 1g
Protein 40g
Vitamin A
17%
Vitamin C
4%
Calcium
29%
Iron
22%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1 package of 6 bagels (your choice of flavor)
  2. ½ dozen large eggs
  3. Salt and pepper
  4. 12 thinly sliced pieces of deli ham
  5. 6 processed cheese slices (such as Kraft, Borden or store brand)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Line a cookie sheet with aluminum foil, open and spread out bagels to ensure even toasting.
  2. Toast bagels in oven 7 to 10 minutes or until lightly toasted. (You don’t want a dark toast on these, just a very light toast) Set aside and let cool.
  3. Meanwhile, in a large non-stick skillet, over medium heat, you want to cook your eggs. Lightly salt and pepper your eggs while in the pan and cook to desired consistency. Set aside and let cool.
  4. Add 1 slice of deli ham to each piece of bagel until each piece is covered.
  5. Add 1 slice of cheese to one ½ of each sandwich and then add 1 egg to other half.
  6. Close sandwich, wrap individually and store in fridge up to a week or freezer for up to 3 months.
  7. Reheat in microwave 20 to 30 seconds.
Lower calorie option
  1. Swap out regular bagels for thinly sliced bagels or low calorie English muffins.
  2. Use egg whites (make sure you save your yolks in fridge or freezer for future use).
  3. Use only ½ a processed cheese slice per sandwich.
beta
calories
643
fat
26g
protein
40g
carbs
60g
more
The Fort Worth Homemaker http://thefortworthhomemaker.com/
** A few notes:

 As for the bread component for these sandwiches, you can use whatever you like, bagels, English muffins, rolls, sandwich buns, Texas toast, etc… I don’t recommend thinly sliced sandwich bread as it tends to break easily and just makes a mess.

This goes for your meat option as well, ham slices are the cheapest, however, you can easily swap it out for bacon or sausage.

When it comes to cooking the eggs; personally, when eating fried eggs, I enjoy a runny yolk, but that really tends to get messy when eating this sandwich so I recommend breaking your yolks during the cooking process or cooking them to over hard. 

When choosing cheese slices for your sandwiches; I would not generally recommend processed cheese slices for many recipes, unlike real cheese, but the processed stuff seems to melt the best giving you a nice creamy flavor and texture.

Finally, if you choose to freeze your breakfast sandwiches, I highly recommend that a night or two before eating, you thaw what you need in the fridge. I have tried to reheat these sandwiches straight from the freezer and it takes almost 2 minutes, thereby; re-cooking some of the components and it makes the flavor and texture of the sandwich less than desirable.

***EXTRA NOTE:

If you are watching your calories, like me, simply swap out regular bagels for thinly sliced bagels or low calorie English muffins.

Use egg whites (make sure you save your yolks in fridge or freezer for future use).

Use only ½ a processed cheese slice per sandwich.

99 Cent Produce

99-cent

By Liz

I frequently get asked about our grocery budget. Most people assume that a weekly grocery bill for a family of 7 has to be so large that it naturally has to be supported by at least 2 incomes. To tell you the truth, when I was working full time outside my home, I had also subscribed to this theory.

However, after deciding to leave the workforce and becoming a full time homemaker and home manager, we have had to make some necessary cutbacks and one of the first and most costly items to slash on our budget was our grocery bill. After all, food is the second highest expense in America, right after shelter.




Now that I am home full time, I concentrate on many meals cooked from scratch and not rely on overpriced, unhealthy convenience items; I have the luxury of time to be able to browse loss leader and discounted items at my local grocery stores; I have stopped buying sugary, carbonated beverages, and I have found a wonderful source for fresh fruits and vegetables at crazy low prices.

The secret I want to share with you today is the 99 Cent Only Stores. This article will not be applicable to many readers as 99 Cent Only Stores, currently only operate in California, Texas, Arizona, and Nevada, but for those of you who have access to one of these stores;  you are missing out if you are trying to keep your food costs down and have not taken full advantage of this gem. (*Please note, I AM NOT getting compensation for any kind of endorsement from the store).

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Many of you reading this might be thinking to yourselves, that you have a Dollar Tree located near you and it is all the same…right?  We do shop for some food items at the Dollar Tree as well, as I have mentioned before, but Dollar Tree stores are limited with their grocery offerings, whereas, more than over half of any 99 Cent Only Store is dedicated to food, produce and grocery items that are ever rotating.

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We are fortunate enough to have 4 of their stores within a 15 mile radius of our home. Of the 4, we have a preferred location, due to the other merchants in that vicinity. Every two weeks, my husband and I will head out to this area and generally make a “date day” of our outing. We may start at one or two garage sales in that area if any are offered, then head over to one of the many restaurants for lunch, maybe followed up by browsing around the local book store that is right next to our destination, before we finally finish our outing by shopping in the 99 Cent Only Store for some great deals.

The main purpose of our visit is to stock up on fresh produce. While there are many other great items and closeout deals in the store, and yes we do pick those up as well, our main focus is always the produce. On our “date day” we will stock up on about 2 weeks of fresh produce to feed our brood with.

99-centOnce we get our produce home, we will take the time to prep our haul to last us for the upcoming weeks until we go shopping again.  We will wash the appropriate fruits and vegetables, slice, dice and cut them into the portion sizes that we will need for various dishes, then store them either with our Food Saver bags, if going into the freezer or in zip lock bags in the fridge to be used in the next 3 to 5 days.

Many have argued and thumbed their noses up at the very idea of being able to get anything fresh from this store. They are thoroughly convinced that the produce is otherwise unworthy to purchase from here as it has to be the cast offs, or “recovered” produce that the fancier and pricier grocery chains would not accept and that these items surely must be unattractive, rotted, shriveled, soggy, and not fit for consumption.

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These kinds of preconceived notions could not be farther from the truth.  Let me reassure you that as with any merchant, the 99 Cent Only Stores have to follow the same laws and regulations that all the other grocers follow, so it would be illegal to sell food items that were not up to par. As far as the produce being “recovered” and/or unattractive….you do realize that some of these now trendy subscription based produce boxes sell the same kind of “seconds” to you, right?, but at a much higher price.

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If you don’t want to take my word for it, just ask Billy Vasquez, also known as the 99 cent chef who has been blogging about his 99 cent ingredient recipes for years:   The 99 Cent Chef

So if you are fortunate enough to have a 99 Cent Only Store in your vicinity and you are trying to reign in your food budget, I highly suggest stopping in at one of these stores, I think you will be pleasantly surprised at what they have to offer and what you will come home with. And if you have stopped in to shop…share it with me; I would be interested to learn about what your particular location has to offer.




My Menu Planning System

 

schedule

By Liz

I often get asked how I come up with a variety of nutritious, delicious, cost efficient meals for me and my family of 7. Unlike most meal and money saving plans, we really, really like to have variety. So one thing that you might notice here, is we don’t have pizza or rice and beans on our menu once a week, each of those is more like once a month.

My system maybe old school, but it is what works best for us.  On our fridge, there are two empty, monthly, block style calendars.  One is for the kids to post their work schedules and school hours and any kind of extra activity that may arise that is out of the norm.  The other is used for dinner planning, as it is the main meal in our house. Also on our fridge is a note pad to be used when I do our weekly grocery shopping.  This is a running list of items that we are either out of, or we are low on.  I have tried to challenge myself to go grocery shopping once a month, but our family goes through a lot of milk, fresh fruit and vegetables.

For our family of 7 we have the fridge in our kitchen, however, its design lacks optimal storage space on the inside, but it came with the house, so it is ours until it dies. We also have an extra fridge that is in our garage that holds mostly beverages, overflow of milk, eggs, juice and coffee creamer as well as meat that needs to be thawed or cut to portion size pieces; the top freezer portion contains bread, rolls, bagels muffins and buns.  In addition we have a 12 cubic foot chest freezer that holds primarily meat, batch cooked meals, ice cream, frozen vegetables and any kind of convenience food that we found worth our hard earned dollars and passes our personal, nutritional guidelines. Also worth mentioning is that we have a good size walk in pantry for all of our dry goods and staples.




Once a week, I will sit down with the kids’ and menu planning calendars and start filling in my dinner menu. I will browse my chest freezer for meat, chicken or fish, check my vegetables and dry goods to pair it with and start building my week of menus. Since the kids’ schedule is ever changing, I do this on a weekly and not a monthly basis, but it is nice to see what we had to eat in a month’s time. It also helps me fill out my running grocery list. If I am in need of an ingredient or will be using the last of a staple, then up on the list it goes.

I don’t plan out our breakfasts. Our house contains mostly adults and not all of us are morning people. I myself, rarely eat breakfast, I know it is the most important meal of the day, but I have always struggled with eating in the mornings.  I am good with just a cup of coffee or two. Some of the family however does like eating early in the morning and because of that there is always a supply of eggs, fruit, bread, jam, peanut butter, oatmeal, yogurt, premade muffins, breakfast sandwiches or burritos (that I make up in batches every two weeks).  We do share a weekly breakfast together, after Sunday service; I will cook brunch for the family that usually consists of a meat, toast, potatoes and eggs made to order, fresh hot coffee, juice and or milk. Once a month I will make either French toast or pancakes served with fresh fruit in place of the toast and potatoes.

Lunches are not planned out either, due to different schedules.  Our house has a revolving door between the hours of 7:00 a.m. to midnight, between work, school and socialization. So our lunches tend to be mostly leftovers, either as is or reworked a little. For instance, if the previous night we had chicken or steak, lunch then becomes either fajitas or quesadillas or if we have leftover baked potatoes from the night before, this easily becomes a broccoli and cheese stuffed potato for lunch.  We also, always have tuna, peanut butter and jelly, ham and cheese on hand in case someone wants a sandwich.

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My system makes it easy for me make the most of the money we spend on groceries. Since we have a freezer full of bread products, I only shop for this once a month. Since we have a freezer full of meat, I only pick more up if I come across a great deal (and I usually do) during my shopping trip. Since we have extra fridge space in the garage, I can stock up on milk, juice and eggs for the week and since we have pantry space, I can stock up on dry goods when they have reached rock bottom prices.

I love to cook and even though I have a formal education in culinary arts, it is not always very practical when operating a large household.  My menu planning contains mainly easy, healthy dishes that require minimum ingredients, time and most important….minimal clean up. Again, it might not work for all, but this is what works for us.